2022-2023 Faculty Fellowships

Since 2008, the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) has organized a fellows program for faculty members who seek to transform or create a course with an integrated community-based learning (CBL) component. Fellows participate in a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) facilitated by CCE staff but driven by the interests and goals of the Faculty Learning Community members.

For the academic year (AY) 2022–2023, the CCE is offering four specialized Faculty Learning Communities. Faculty may apply to multiple FLCs, but will only be accepted into one.  All applications must be received by Saturday, April 16 at 5:00 PM.

CCE Faculty Learning Committees are open to any instructor who will be teaching at the University of Richmond in AY 2022–2023.

The Collaboratory: Cemeteries and Community 

(Maximum of 5 available UR fellowships) Formed in 2017, the Collaboratory is a cross-institutional group that brings together university faculty and community members to document and curate African American history and culture in Richmond through cemetery restoration and research. This collaboration between UR and VCU faculty and community partners provides opportunities for new faculty and community members to join in AY 2022–2023; previous Collaboratory members are also welcome to apply. The Collaboratory's mission is to "produce place-based knowledge that contributes to a community dialogue about our collective past." A digital map and archive that serve as a public resource for locating buried individuals is one Collaboratory product.

The Collaboratory offers a supportive forum for members seeking to deepen their engagement with a broader community of scholars, artists, community members, and descendants who share a commitment to cemetery restoration and research. Collaboratory members pool resources and energies for special initiatives and events. Proposed activities may be, but do not have to be, connected to a particular class. While the CCE welcomes projects that build upon earlier Collaboratory work, we are also eager to support new projects that represent applicants' interests and expertise, including those related to other historic African American cemeteries, such as Woodland and Barton Heights. Throughout the academic year, the Collaboratory will meet to offer support, share collective wisdom, coordinate efforts, and plan a public-facing event. The CCE will support Collaboratory meetings and offer small grants to support Collaboratory projects.

Collaboratory Fellows commit to:

  • Attend a half-day planning meeting in mid-May (date TBD)
  • Attend a half-day planning meeting in August (date TBD)
  • Contribute to the Collaboratory's ongoing work through connection to a class, research, or other project
  • Attend all Collaboratory FLC meetings (approximately one per month) across the academic year
  • Take part in an event to share their work with the public
  • Participate in assessment activities

Collaboratory Fellows will receive a $250 stipend for their participation in the May planning meeting, a $250 stipend for their participation in the August planning meeting, and $1,000 (adjusted for attendance) for their participation in all Collaboratory FLC meetings across AY 2022–2023. Stipends for participation cannot be made to organizations and must be made to individuals.

 

Interconnections: Campus and City

(Maximum of 6 available fellowships) The work of community engagement is typically seen as movement off of campus and into the community. Yet, this framing creates a false division that obscures the ways in which our campus and our community are interconnected. Discussions in past Eco-corridor and Institutional History FLCs noted this interconnectivity and the potential for further development.

The Interconnections: Campus and City FLC will support the exploration and development of connections between campus and city by facilitating opportunities for community members to engage with UR history and resources. Have you taught a class with a connection either to campus or to the Richmond community? This could be done through a number of means. Examples include:

  • Studying invasive species in the UR Eco-corridor and at nearby Huguenot Flatwater with the James River Park System
  • Studying the UR Burial Ground report alongside the enslaved burial grounds 
  • Considering a university's economic impacts in tandem with the UR purchasing department and a municipal partner
  • Exploring UR sustainability programs with the City of Richmond Office of Sustainability to coordinate an educational celebration of Earth Week

Applicants should  envision a course that grows from their own work, makes explicit connections between campus and city, and utilizes community-based pedagogy in at least one assignment in AY 2022–2023. We welcome partial ideas that are ripe for development over the coming year, and also welcome applications from faculty who have participated in Eco-corridor or Institutional History work.

Interconnections Fellows commit to:

  • Attend a planning meeting in May (between May 11 and May 30, date TBD)
  • Develop a community partner, campus partner, or project over the summer 
  • Attend a summer assignment/syllabus drafting meeting
  • Attend all Interconnections FLC meetings (approximately one per month) throughout the year
  • Participate in potential joint projects with other classes, as appropriate
  • Participate in assessment activities

Interconnections Fellows will receive a $250 stipend for their participation in the May planning meeting, a $250 stipend for their participation in the summer assignment/syllabus drafting meeting, and $1,000 (adjusted for attendance) for their participation in all Interconnections FLC meetings across AY 2022–2023.

 

(Re)engage Together

(Maximum of 8 available fellowships) We have all been impacted by the pandemic. As we re-emerge from our practices of safe-distancing, our transformed selves are engaging with a community that has also been transformed. In the emerging new normal, how do you want to engage as a teacher-scholar? What matters to you now? What does community engagement look like now?  

(Re)engage Together is an FLC for everyone: for faculty whose courses engaged with the city before the pandemic who want to rethink a class, for faculty who do not have prior community-engaged teaching experience, and for new faculty who are looking to engage with the Richmond area for the purposes of learning. In addition to FLC meetings, (Re)engageTogether fellows will pair up for year-long "co-mentoring relationships," a reciprocal mentorship practice in which participants learn from one another in a mutually beneficial way.

(Re)engage Together Fellows commit to:

  • Pair with another faculty member for the purpose of co-mentoring
  • Attend a half-day planning meeting in May (between May 11 and May 30, date TBD)
  • Attend a half-day planning meeting in August (date TBD)
  • Meet once with their co-mentor over the summer
  • Attend all (Re)engage Together FLC meetings (approximately one per month) throughout the year
  • Employ CBL pedagogy in at least one assignment/class during AY 2022–2023
  • Participate in assessment activities

(Re)engage Together Fellows will receive a $250 stipend for their participation in the May planning meeting, a $250 stipend for their participation in the August planning meeting, and $1,000 (adjusted for attendance) for their participation in all (Re)engage Together FLC meetings across AY 2022–2023.

 

Community-Engaged Scholarship: Writing for Academic Audiences

(Led by Dr. Lynn E. Pelco, Visiting Scholar in the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement, maximum of 4 available fellowships) Community engagement at the University of Richmond describes the “collaboration between the University and its larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial creation and exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.” Community-engaged scholars and their partners disseminate new knowledge resulting from their collaborations to various audiences, including academic audiences. For example, community-engaged teaching that results in unique student learning outcomes can be shared in refereed journal articles and at national academic conferences. Innovative strategies for developing mutually beneficial university-community partnerships can be shared in co-authored book chapters. Click here for examples from UR faculty.

We invite community-engaged faculty from all schools, disciplines, and statuses to join in a faculty learning cohort designed to assist scholars in disseminating their community engagement work to academic audiences. Participants in the cohort will learn about the wide variety of venues for disseminating community-engaged scholarship to academic audiences, will create and implement individual writing plans, and will receive support from the cohort facilitator and each other in developing a minimum of two written products.

Community-Engaged Scholarship Fellows commit to:

  • Attend a half-day planning meeting in May (date TBD)
  • Attend a half-day August meeting at which they'll share their writing plans (date TBD
  • Attend all Community-Engaged Scholarship FLC meetings (6 in total) across the academic year

Community-Engaged Scholarship Fellows will receive a $250 stipend for their participation in the May planning meeting, a $250 stipend for their participation in the August meeting at which they'll share their writing plans, and $1,000 (adjusted for attendance) for their participation in all Community-Engaged Scholarship FLC meetings across AY 2022–2023. Fellows are also eligible for travel funds of up to $1,500 for conferences at which they are presenting on their work.